Thursday, 31 May 2018

RHA Limber for Afghanistan

Back when I was collecting World War One figures, I acquired this nice Royal Horse Artillery limber. I believe it is from Wargames Foundry:







As it happens, I never used this limber in a game. Artillery in my WWI games never needed to be moved.  However, as I've been getting in more Afghanistan and NWF games, I've been inspired to create a scenario around 'Saving the Guns at Maiwand'.  Below is a detail from the painting "Maiwand: Saving the Guns" by Richard Caton Woodville.

When I assembled limbers more recently for my Napoleonic Russian army, I put them on very large bases like this:

It's big, takes up a lot of space, and involves a lot of mucking about trying to build traces and what not, which is enough of a hassle for a standing limber team, but altogether far too tricky to build for a dynamic team in full gallop as with the WWI limber.  So I've decided to stick with the three bases with pairs of horses.  This will let the model have some flexibility on the table, as I'll be able to have it go around corners (within reason).  Traces will be inferred.

So with the repaint and head swaps for the crew, this is how it turned out.  Once I get some Afghan horsemen painted up, I might be ready for a saving the guns scenario with TMWWBK!



Horses are virtually unchanged from previously.  Humans have had headswaps and been repainted to khaki.  If you look carefully, you'll see the headswaps aren't perfect, some of the heads are squished at the back and the line of connection is a bit rough.  Limber has been repainted from green to grey and bases have been redone from grass to sand.

You can see how long the whole bit gets with the gun attached.  I should have set down a ruler!  It's about 21 cm (8.5") including the gun so it will take up a fair chunk of the table in a game.  This is where the separate bases will make a difference.





Here is an attempt at the perspective of the Woodville painting.



 I just need to change the background :) 


And here's a comparison with the artillery crew I painted years ago when I was in Kandahar.  Uniforms are a bit different, the 1880 RHA didn't have the bandoliers, for example.



And finally front and rear views of the team.